While recently downloading (or is it called uploading) many apps to my iPad, I realized that several of the apps were simple apps addressing one specific need or target area. I thought, these simple apps are ideal for the special needs population! Some are free and others are priced very reasonably. Comprehensive apps, that fall into the really good category, are difficult to come by. With the exception of a few apps, most apps succeed best when they are simply what they set out to be, and that is to work on one skill set. Here are the latest of what I find to be great apps for the price. Please consider these apps appropriate for any child, not just special needs, depending on where they are developmentally.

-1PreWriting, by Toni Sanz, sure would have saved plenty of paper in the old days, as I copied1099-1-prewriting-1 exercises like this all the time for my students for classwork and homework. This company is comprised of a trio based in Barcelona, Spain. They have several other apps worth checking into as well.

 

 
1069-1-pickerpicsPickerPics is designed to help reinforce visual perception of shapes, colors, or sequence, as well as help with attention and concentration skills. This app is set up like a slot machine and children need to spin the dials to match the appropriate set, whether it be shape, color or the challenging sequence segment.

 

 
1865-1-catch-a-figure.-liteCatch a Figure, by Smart Cat Studios, is a series of mini-games tourl-2 help your child with number and figure visualization skills; color visualization skills and also listening recognition. This educational app take into account age characteristics of a little child: eyesight specifics, limited time of concentration and supplies of colorful illustrations.

 
icon_2Their other app, Counting Race, helps with beginning number and beginning addition skills. This is a multiplayer game app and a great way to infuse education and social time for children and their parent’s and caregiver’s. It’s a game to help build skills of counting quickly and learning addition from numbers 1 to 10. The developer’s aim is to teach children to count by intuition. In the settings, it gives the choice of counting up to 5 or up to 10, depending on child’s math ability.

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One Response to 4 Simple Apps for Special Needs & Specific Skills

  1. […] While recently downloading many apps to my iPad, I realized that several of the apps were simple apps addressing one specific need or target area  […]