imgresappoLearning, by Appolicious, has recently been released and you might wonder why we are reviewing our competition? If you adhere to the philosophy that competition is healthy, than you’ll understand. We are confident in our review site’s following and want to give you all the options to finding the best educational apps out there. Who knows, this may even spur us both on to greater heights of excellence in what we do! appoLearning has taken a wide stance of promoting 150 different subject areas. They have condensed this to feature only their top five in each category, but beware, it can be misleading if you are not familiar with their rubric. Apps are given scores and end up with a number between 70 -100. Their rubric or appoLearning ReportCard consists of six categories: Educational Content, Kid Appeal, Assessment, Features and Design, Value, and Safety and Privacy. If an app is lacking an assessment component it may loose points, even if the app doesn’t necessarily warrant the assessment component. Just saying.

photo-1photoWe corresponded with Brad Spirrison, Managing Editor of Appolicious, to make sure we had our facts straight and he responded with: The Report Score theoretically can go from 0 – 100, but in practice you are correct that nearly all of them fall in that range (low 70s to 100). The scores are generated when an Expert reviewer scores them with our rubric, and then vetted by additional Experts and our editorial team. As far as updates, we check each category once per month and see if there are relevant new releases or significant updates worthy for consideration. We also welcome our Experts to update categories with apps that are either new or had not made their radar at the time of evaluation. If a new or alternate app scores higher than the incumbent 5, we showcase it in the category. 

 The website at this point allows users to sample the content (approximately five free views per month), and then users are encouraged to download the app for unlimited access.

appoLearning does have a large group of “65 experts” reviewing for them and there are several big names. Mrs. Judd, Monica Burns, from ClassTech Tips, and many others from all walks of life. We like that, having a bigger pool of reviewers can help weed out the good from the bad and brings several perspectives into the mix. The app is slick, well written, functional and a great resource for finding what you need for your children or students.

imgres-1Download appoLearning to find the best educational apps for kids and high school-aged students handpicked by teachers and app experts. appoLearning showcases the five best educational apps across more than 150 different subjects.

There are thousands of educational apps created for the iPad, yet only a precious few are worth downloading. appoLearning lets parents know which educational apps they should encourage their kids to use, while also detailing the skills that are taught within each recommended application.

TWA does use a rubric, but it is quite different in philosophy. We take into account and consider a variety of features. We use a more Holistic Rubric,
a rubric that consists of a set of descriptors that generate a single, global score for the entire work. We only review quality educational apps and do not feel comfortable giving them scores, as we consider it too subjective.

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2 Responses to Enter appoLearning, the App

  1. Good afternoon. I see that you are interested in apps for the education sector, so I thought I would see if you have any interest in our new emergency response app for teachers and staff called CrisisGo? If so, I would like to show you its features and get your thoughts about it. In the meantime, please view our three-minute marketing video: http://video.crisisgo.com

    Thanks for your consideration.

    • Teachers With Apps says:

      Hi Rebecca, Thanks for your interest in Teachers With Apps. Please check your email for a full response. Thanks – TWA