by Carisa Kluver
The Digital Media Diet

Fun read for preschoolers about things that live & grow!

705778137x356Living vs Nonliving : Do you know which ones will grow? by CJ Educations – If a piglet grows into a pig, shouldn’t a stool also grow to be a chair? What about a car … can it grow up to be a truck? These are the types of curious questions children ask, reflected beautifully by this book app. It’s engaging in a way that is perfectly tailored to the learning needs of toddlers and preschoolers, with nice narration, relevant interactive enhancements and great pacing and chunking of the text.

If a piglet grows into a pig, shouldn’t a stool also grow to be a chair? What about a car … can it grow up to be a truck? These are the types of curious questions children ask, reflected beautifully by this book app. It’s engaging in a way that is perfectly tailored to the learning needs of toddlers and preschoolers, with nice narration, relevant interactive enhancements and great pacing and chunking of the text. – See more at: http://digital-storytime.com/review.php?id=828#sthash.cFzXlyM5.BukclHjd.dpuf

If a piglet grows into a pig, shouldn’t a stool also grow to be a chair? What about a car … can it grow up to be a truck? These are the types of curious questions children ask, reflected beautifully by this book app. It’s engaging in a way that is perfectly tailored to the learning needs of toddlers and preschoolers, with nice narration, relevant interactive enhancements and great pacing and chunking of the text. – See more at: http://digital-storytime.com/review.php?id=828#sthash.cFzXlyM5.BukclHjd.dpuf

Based on the print title Do You Know Which Ones Will Grow? published in 2011 by Susan A. Shea and Tom Slaughter, this is a story that makes the digital transition seamlessly. A quiz is included within the pages of the book and also as a separate game, testing children’s reading comprehension and understanding of the basic concept of the book.

The only issue I have is the title of the app on iTunes … Living vs Nonliving : Do you know which ones will grow?. The developer partnership includes a Korean company that has not yet translated their website into English and the translation issue shows up in their choice to name this title in such an odd way. I cannot say that the word, “nonliving” is something that rolls off my tongue as an English-speaker and when it does, it usually refers to zombies and not to boring inanimate objects that cannot grow (as in this book). If I were to make any suggestion to the developer, it would be to make the print title the same as the iTunes title, unless a professional, native interpreter is involved.

But the actual book app is delightful once download with only a couple minor technical issues. The help screen is still partially in Korean and there is no way to read the book without narration unless you mute the sound. Otherwise, it’s a perfect translation from the English title in print, featuring a lot of examples for children of both living and ‘nonliving’ things. This is an important topic for young kids (and this book makes exploring it extra fun). While researching this topic, I even found some additional resources for teaching about the concept of “living vs nonliving” from PBS.

additional resources for teaching about the concept of “living vs nonliving” from PBS – See more at: http://digital-storytime.com/review.php?id=828#sthash.cFzXlyM5.BukclHjd.dpuf

With polished production values and nice settings for navigation, this app will appeal to children aged 4-8. The game included provides a nice way to quiz children after reading that won’t feel at all like being tested. From CJ Educations, creator of AlphaBeasties, this app is solidly built and developmentally spot on for young children’s learning needs.

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About the Author:

digital-storytime-150x117This review was originally published by Digital Media Diet on October 24, 2013. Carisa Kluver, a mom & educator, created Digital Media in December 2010 with her husband Marc Kluver, an app developer. Marc was a computer engineer who decided to teach himself Android & iOS app programming, as well as web design after a career in various programming jobs. Carisa Kluver had been a school counselor, health educator and researcher in child & maternal health prior to starting this project. In addition to this site, they have developed several apps, including “Dash & Ditto’s Playground” for iPhone. For more information about their other projects see: catglo.com

 

If a piglet grows into a pig, shouldn’t a stool also grow to be a chair? What about a car … can it grow up to be a truck? These are the types of curious questions children ask, reflected beautifully by this book app. It’s engaging in a way that is perfectly tailored to the learning needs of toddlers and preschoolers, with nice narration, relevant interactive enhancements and great pacing and chunking of the text.

Based on the print title Do You Know Which Ones Will Grow? published in 2011 by Susan A. Shea and Tom Slaughter, this is a story that makes the digital transition seamlessly. A quiz is included within the pages of the book and also as a separate game, testing children’s reading comprehension and understanding of the basic concept of the book.

The only issue I have is the title of the app on iTunes … Living vs Nonliving : Do you know which ones will grow?. The developer partnership includes a Korean company that has not yet translated their website into English and the translation issue shows up in their choice to name this title in such an odd way. I cannot say that the word, “nonliving” is something that rolls off my tongue as an English-speaker and when it does, it usually refers to zombies and not to boring inanimate objects that cannot grow (as in this book). If I were to make any suggestion to the developer, it would be to make the print title the same as the iTunes title, unless a professional, native interpreter is involved.

But the actual book app is delightful once download with only a couple minor technical issues. The help screen is still partially in Korean and there is no way to read the book without narration unless you mute the sound. Otherwise, it’s a perfect translation from the English title in print, featuring a lot of examples for children of both living and ‘nonliving’ things. This is an important topic for young kids (and this book makes exploring it extra fun). While researching this topic, I even found some additional resources for teaching about the concept of “living vs nonliving” from PBS.

With polished production values and nice settings for navigation, this app will appeal to children aged 4-8. The game included provides a nice way to quiz children after reading that won’t feel at all like being tested. From CJ Educations, creator of AlphaBeasties, this app is solidly built and developmentally spot on for young children’s learning needs.

– See more at: http://digital-storytime.com/review.php?id=828#sthash.cFzXlyM5.BukclHjd.dpuf

About the Author

digital-storytimeThis review was originally published by Digital Media Diet on January 14, 2014. Carisa Kluver, a mom & educator, created Digital Media in December 2010 with her husband Marc Kluver, an app developer. Marc was a computer engineer who decided to teach himself Android & iOS app programming, as well as web design after a career in various programming jobs. Carisa Kluver had been a school counselor, health educator and researcher in child & maternal health prior to starting this project. In addition to this site, they have developed several apps, including “Dash & Ditto’s Playground” for iPhone. For more information about their other projects see: catglo.com

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