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This is an excerpt of the complete article by Terry Heick, The Real Problem With Multiple-Choice Questions viewable on edutopia.org 

The multiple-choice problem is becoming a bit of an issue.

While it has been derided by educators for decades as incapable of truly measuring understanding, and while performance on such exams can be noticeably improved simply by learning a few tricks, the multiple choice question may have a larger, less obvious flaw that disrupts the tone of learning itself. This is a tone that is becoming increasingly important in the 21st century as access to information increases, as the updating of information happens more naturally, and as blended and mobile learning environments become more common.

Tone

Learning depends on a rather eccentric mix of procedural and declarative knowledge — on the process as much as the end product. Students are often as confused by teacher instructions or activity workflow as they are by the content itself. Keep a tally of how often student questions are related to the logistics of the assignment versus the content itself. You might be surprised.

The process of mastering mathematics, for example, is served as much by a consistent process of practice as it is the practice itself. If learning is the result of acquiring “new data” and organically folding it into “old data,” how students come to that new data is incredibly important. They are best served by a short, taut the line between student and content-to-be-mastered. Even the transparency and apparent relevance of a classroom activity factor into the “value” of a learning experience as much as how cleanly that activity aligns with an academic standard.

This all emphasizes the value of uncertainty in learning.

Read the rest of the article on Terry Heick’s blog on edutopia.org

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